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Real or Fake? An Illustrated Guide On How To Authenticate Hermes Ties

Updated on February 27, 2016
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The most highly prized among men's ties are the hand-folded silk twill ties made by Hermes. The look is timeless, elegant, and will set you back about $200 per tie.

Sadly, Hermes ties are some of the most counterfeited ties on the market--you have to be very careful when shopping online. If you're shopping for an affordable, gently-used and second-hand Hermes ties, there are some ways you can authenticate your potential purchase to ensure that you are purchasing an authentic Hermes tie.

The re-sale value of Hermes ties is still very high for ties that are in good condition. A second-hand Hermes tie in good condition can easily sell for about $80 to $120 on average, however this isn't always the case. Older Hermes ties generally retail for less and scarf-pattern ties and limited-edition ties can command a higher price, sometimes up to $400.

As you start to shop for gently-used Hermes ties, here are some ways you can authenticate a potential purchase.

1. Check the quality of the silk

Hermes ties are made from the finest available silks, so if you find a tie that doesn't feel or look like silk then it's not an Hermes tie. The fabric should appear matte, not shiny. The silk from a Hermes tie should be soft to the touch, but sturdy--your fingers should easily slide across the fabric.

Check the quality of the silk
Check the quality of the silk | Source

2. Check the bias of the twill

The direction of the twill on each Hermes ties always points in the same direction. This is usually the easiest way to spot a fake, and usually where counterfeiters get it wrong.

The twill on the front of a real Hermes tie will be in in a diagonal direction of 11 and 5 o'clock, as shown below.

Check the bias of the twill (front)
Check the bias of the twill (front) | Source

The back of the tie will be the direction of the 2 and 8 o'clock, as shown below.

Check the bias of the twill (back)
Check the bias of the twill (back) | Source

3. Check the tipping

The tipping is the liner fabric under the shell on the backside of the tie. The tipping on a Hermes tie in should match the background color of the tie. The tipping should be in most cases a single, solid color. However, on some of the scarf ties, the tipping may have an "H" mark pattern.

Check the tipping
Check the tipping | Source

4. Check for a hand-sewn slip stitch

Each and every single Hermes tie is made from a single piece of thread and delicately sewn together. Often, fakes will be sewn with multiple threads.

The easiest way to check the stitching is to gently pull the on the folds of the back of the tie to see that a single piece of thread is sewn into the fold. The thread color should complement the color of the tie.

Check for a hand-sewn slip stitch
Check for a hand-sewn slip stitch | Source

5. Check for a hanging tension thread

On the back of a Hermes tie, lift up the bottom fold and there will be (usually) a hanging thread. This is also another tell-tell sign that the tie is authentic.

However, I have purchased Hermes ties directly from the Hermes store where the hanging thread can no longer be seen, so something to consider when you're buying second-hand; I think as the time gets adjusted, the thread may be pulled back into the tie.

Check for a hanging tension thread
Check for a hanging tension thread | Source

6. Check the bar tack

The bar tack is a small thread that appears on the top and bottom of the tie. On a Hermes tie, the bar tack should be a thicker thread that matches the background color of the tie.

Check the bar tack
Check the bar tack | Source

7. Check for a dovetail fold

Each end of an Hermes tie is folded in a "dovetail" style." When looking at the back of an Hermes tie the back should be folded left over right. Every Hermes tie follows this style. If your tie isn't folded or sewn on, then you have a fake.

Also check the other minor folds on the tie. The very bottom tip on the wide end of the tie should be folded right over left and the narrow end should be folded right over left.

Check for a dovetail fold
Check for a dovetail fold | Source

8. Check signature Horse & Carriage logo

The Hermes stamp on the tie should be square with the horse carriage at the top, the word "HERMES" in the middle and "PARIS (C)" at the bottom. The Hermes stamps is printed directly into the fabric; if you see a Hermes tie where this is sewn into the tie, then it's fake.

Also check the number of spokes in the wheels. Unlike the tie stay ("self-loop), the wheel on the stamp has five spokes instead of six, like on the tie stay.

Check signature Horse & Carriage logo
Check signature Horse & Carriage logo | Source

9. Check the pattern mark on the back

Each Hermes tie has printed into the fabric a pattern mark indicating the pattern of the tie and the artist who sewed it together.

The pattern mark is small rectangle on the back of the tie with "MADE IN FRANCE" at the top, the pattern number in the middle (e.g. 5382 OA), and "100% SOIE" on the bottom.

The top text should be all caps, sans-serif, and the artist initials should be in a serif font, and the bottom text should be all caps, sans-serif.

Check the pattern mark on the back
Check the pattern mark on the back | Source

10. Check the self-loop

The tie stay on the back of the tie should be sewn with white thread. The regular silk twill ties will have text vertically positioned on each side of the the stay with the horse carriage in the middle. The left side of the tie will read "DRY CLEAN ONLY" and the right side will read "100% SILK."

Also count the number of spokes on the wheels on the carriage--there should be six.

Check the self-loop (regular twill ties)
Check the self-loop (regular twill ties) | Source

However, there is an exception. Some of the heavy silk twill and scarf-ties use a different tie stay.

Stays on these ties have white text with vertical text on the left, right, and bottom of the horse carriage in the center. The text on the left reads "DRY CLEAN ONLY" and on the right reads "MADE IN FRANCE" and on the bottom "HERMES-PARIS."

Check the self-loop (heavy twill and scarf ties)
Check the self-loop (heavy twill and scarf ties) | Source

11. Check the measurements

Hermes ties have been different sizes over the years, but the newer ties all fit the same measurement profile. However, when shopping for gently-used ties, there's a possibility that the tie may have been washed or dry cleaned, so those measurements could be off by a small number.

For the new ties, they are generally 3.75" inches wide at the widest point at the bottom and about 60" inches long.

Check the measurements
Check the measurements | Source

12. Check the weight of the tie

A regular silk twill tie will weigh about 1.6 ounces (44 grams). Fake hermes ties will generally be much heavier.

Check the weight of the tie
Check the weight of the tie | Source

Where To Buy Used Hermes Ties

If you're looking for gently-used, authentic Hermes ties, there are a few places you can shop.

  • eBay (new, used, and vintage)
  • BlueFly (new, last season)
  • FarFetch (vintage)
  • Rafaello Network (new, last season)

eBay

When it comes to shopping for used Hermes ties, eBay is probably the largest market place. If there is a particular pattern you're looking for, chances are you will find it here (or just wait a week or so until it pops up for sale). There are a number of reputable sellers who specialize in men's Hermes ties, and I can personally attest to their reputability.

The three top sellers for Hermes ties are:

  • maverick73
  • andyinternational
  • bluebeardltd

Seller: maverick73

Hermes collector, Stephen Williams, is the owner of this eBay store. He has been collecting, buying, and selling Hermes ties for over 15 years.

He offers an incredible collection--I've purchased a number of ties from him. On average he tends to have over 100 ties for sale at any given time. He's got many of the new and old patterns, and handful of vintage ties.

On average, his ties go for $90 to $120. He's had 9,000 transactions on eBay with 99.9% positive feedback.

To check out this seller's Hermes tie collection, check out his store link to the right.

Seller: andyinternational

This California-based seller, Andrew, carries about 100 Hermes ties on average, offering a good mix of newer and older patterns.

On average, this seller's ties run for $90 to $120. This seller has had over 12,000 transactions with 99.9% positive feedback. Authenticity is guaranteed.

To check out this seller's Hermes tie collection, check out his store link to the right.

Seller: bluebeardltd

This seller has been in business over 15 years and carries over 100 Hermes ties on average with a mix of new, rare, and vintage patterns.

On average, this seller's ties run for $50 to $120. This seller has had over 11,000 transactions with 100% positive feedback. Authenticity is guaranteed.

To check out this seller's Hermes tie collection, check out his store link to the right.

BlueFly

BlueFly.com often carriers a number of "last season" ties from Hermes. They generally don't offer the whimsical ties though, but they do carry many of the other simple or geometric pattern ties.

FarFetch

FarFetch.com is an online fashion retailer that carries mostly new fashions. However, they also have a carefully curated collection of vintage clothes, including Hermes ties.

Raffello Network

Rafaello Network, like BlueFly, carries a small selection of "last season" Hermes ties.

How To Clean A Hermes Tie

If you're on the market to purchase a second-hand Hermes tie, you may stumble across a tie that you want, but it needs cleaning. Don't let a tie stain steer you away from not purchasing the tie you want--a professional tie cleaner can remove just about anything.

You should never take your tie to just any dry cleaner. There are cleaners who specialize in cleaning ties--you want to use these services instead. If you take a Hermes tie to a regular dry cleaner it will be returned shrunken and wilted.

There are two professional tie cleaners in the US that specialize in Hermes ties:

  • Rave Fabricare (based in Arizona) - pricing starts at $22.50 per tie
  • Tie Crafters (based in New York) - pricing starts at $16 per tie

I've sent Rave Fabricare some interesting tie stains, and they can work miracles on ties; my ties were returned looking brand new and in the perfect shape.

What style of Hermes ties is your favorite?

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    • profile image

      JustSaying 2 months ago

      Is there a book or catalog where you can check the Hermes number to see when it was produced?

    • profile image

      Burton 9 months ago

      Hi! I have 5 gently used Hermes ties aswell, but they weight between 41 and 47 gramms and they all were bought from Hermes , so the question is that : The weight of a Hermes tie is 44 gramms or 44 gramms plus-minus 3 gramms?

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      mrpatcat 20 months ago

      hi i have to gently used hermes ties that meet all the criteria listed here, however one of my ties weighs 1.39oz and the other 1.59 is the weight good for authentic H ties they are no heavier for sure

    • profile image

      Shredder 22 months ago

      Wow, this is a truly great guide! Thank you for laying everything out so concisely. As a young man just learning to appreciate a quality tie, it's fantastic to have such an all encompassing resource.

      If you could do something similar, with a focus on Versace ties, that would be awesome!