Sulfates on Hair: Effects and Tips

Updated on June 8, 2015
Sulfate-free shampoo is can provide many great benefits for your hair.
Sulfate-free shampoo is can provide many great benefits for your hair.

What are Sulfates?

Most likely don't put much thought into choosing a shampoo for their hair—some will decide based on the shampoo's fragrance, while others will choose based on what the shampoo promises to do for your locks. As a hairstylist, I recommend shampoos to my clients everyday, and never once does anyone ask, "What are the ingredients used in this shampoo?" Not many people realize the effects that certain ingredients can have on their hair and scalp.

One of the most common ingredients used in most shampoos are sulfates. Sulfates are detergents used to make the shampoo lather. They're are inexpensive to use in shampoos, which explains why more than 90% of shampoos contain them. The most common sulfates used in these shampoos are:

  • Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS)
  • Sodium Laureth Sulphate (SLES)
  • Ammonia Laureth Sulphate (ALS)
  • TEA Lauryeth Sulfate (TEA)
  • Sodium Myreth Sulphate (SMS)

These sulfates are also contained in most household cleaning products! Would you put househould cleaning products on your hair? I don't think so! So why put sulfates in your hair?

Effects of Sulfates on Your Hair and Scalp

Sulfates have the potential to wreak total havoc on your hair. There are many negative effects that sulfates can cause to your hair shaft, hair follicles, and your scalp. Some of these include:

  • Dry hair and scalp. Sulfates dissolve all of the natural oils on your scalp, thus leaving your hair and scalp dryer than normal.
  • Scalp irritations. Sulfates have the potential to worsen dandruff and eczema. In turn they also leave your scalp feeling tight and itchy.
  • Fading hair colour. If you colour your hair, the aggressive cleansing that sulfates gives you will strip your hair of that colour, leaving you with dull, faded locks.
  • Hair loss. Sulfates corrode and damage your hair follicles, which leads to hair loss. This is especially true if you don't properly rinse shampoo out of your hair.

You should especially avoid sulfates if you colour your hair, the aggressive cleansing that sulfates gives you will strip your hair of that colour.
You should especially avoid sulfates if you colour your hair, the aggressive cleansing that sulfates gives you will strip your hair of that colour. | Source

Switching to a Sulfate-Free Shampoo

When switching from your regular shampoo to a sulfate-free shampoo, there may be a few minor things that you will need to get used to. Even if you struggle with these changes, you should always keep in mind that switching to a sulfate-free shampoo is the beginning to having a healthier scalp and healthier hair. The struggle will be worth it.

1. No lather. The first thing that you are going to notice about sulfate-free shampoos is that they do not lather. This is a problem for many people because they do not feel that their hair is being properly cleansed. However, you must remember that the only reason that other shampoos lather so much is due to the sulfates that are contained in them. If you are going to avoid sulfates, you must accept the fact that your sulfate-free shampoo is not going to lather like your old shampoo did.

Some tips for getting the most lather out of your sulfate-free shampoo:

  • Make sure your hair is thoroughly saturated with water before applying the shampoo to your hair.
  • Wash your hair twice! The first shampoo will remove the dirt and oil from your hair, making it easier for your shampoo to lather during the second wash. Washing your hair twice with sulfate-free shampoo is still less damaging than washing your hair once with sulfates.

2. Oily Hair. You may also notice that after switching over to your new, sulfate-free shampoo that your hair tends to feel oily a lot faster than it used to. Now that you are not stripping your hair of all of its natural oils, some people may find that their hair feels like its becoming oily quickly. Although nothing can moisturize your hair as well as your hair's natural oils, this can be a problem for some people, especially if they don't like to wash their hair as often as others do.

  • One option would be to wear your hair in a bun or a ponytail on the days that your hair doesn't feel as clean as you would like it to.
  • However, I think the best option would be to start using dry shampoo. Dry shampoo is sprayed at the roots of your hair, and what it does is absorb any oil that is in your hair, leaving it looking and feeling as if you had just washed it. My two favourite and affordable dry shampoos are:
  1. Batiste Dry Shampoo (Original)
  2. Tresemme Fresh Start Volumizing Dry Shampoo

All in all, protecting your hair from the potential damage that sulfates can cause is well worth adapting to the changes that come along with using a sulfate-free shampoo!

Recommended Sulfate-Free Shampoos

There are many sulfate-free shampoos that are on the market to choose from. So to make it a little easier, here is a list of the top ten best sulfate-free shampoos out there.

  1. Pureology Pure Volume Shampoo
  2. L'Oreal Everstrong Sulfate-Free Fortify Shampoo
  3. Morrocanoil Extra Volume Shampoo
  4. Aveeno Pure Renewal Shampoo
  5. Joico Smooth Cure Shampoo
  6. Jason Natural Shampoos
  7. One 'N Only Argan Oil Moisture Repair Shampoo
  8. Hemps Couture Moisturizing Shampoo
  9. Aveda Scalp Beneifts Balancing Shampoo
  10. Tigi Bed Head Superstar Sulfate-Free Shampoo

Questions & Answers

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      • profile image

        hey guy am alem 

        7 months ago

        I got lot of important information thank you

      • profile image

        Linda 

        10 months ago

        I switched to the L'Oreal sulfate free a month ago ... and soft beachy waves are showing up in my previously board-straight long hair. I love these soft waves. But where did they come from?? All my life my long hair has been really, really straight and never held curls well. Is it possible that somehow the sulfate-free shampoo is revealing a curl pattern that was hidden in my hair all these years???

      • profile image

        Janice 

        14 months ago

        I had an allergic reaction to hair dye and my hair is falling out, it was recommended that i use sulphate free shampoo, i have been using aloe and jojoba shampoo now for about a month but my hair is still falling has anyone got any suggestions as to how i can stop it i am worried it won't grow back.

      • profile image

        Michaella 

        16 months ago

        Thank you for your article !

        I have been using sulfate, paraben and silicone free shampoo and conditioner for a while now. I then rinse with Apple cider vinegar and moisturise with pure Argan oil.

        My hair is thick, wavy and voluminous. It was heat damaged so it became a dull, dried out maine. The more non-organic products I used, the more I needed and the more it dried out my hair. So I stopped all together, chopped my hair and started all organic.

        The result is great and cheap !

        I also learnt that our hair textures are all unique, like us. So we have to try different amounts of these organic products on our own hair and see what works best.

        Last tip: I switch to virgin coconut oil as a hair mask in winter when my hair needs more nourishment.

        Finally, most days because my natural hair oils are restored and kept now. I only need a little Argan oil to tame it daily.

        Good luck ladies :)

      • profile image

        Paula Nichols 

        2 years ago

        After using sulfate free shampoos, what is a recommended conditioner to prevent dryness and brittle hair. ????

      • profile image

        Mystica 

        2 years ago

        I will definitely switch to a sulphate free shampoo today. Any suggestions on conditioner as well?

      • profile image

        Cindy 

        3 years ago

        I have been using sulfate free shampoo for about 2 months now and my hair is much dryer than before and more of it is breaking off than before. Is it possible that since everyone's chemical makeup is different that sulfate free may not be best for ALL hair types?

      • profile image

        Cosette 

        3 years ago

        What is your source for this information?

      • melissairene profile imageAUTHOR

        Melissa Jongman 

        4 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

        Not a problem! There's so many sulfate-free shampoo products out there and it's worth the switch!

      • melissairene profile imageAUTHOR

        Melissa Jongman 

        4 years ago from Toronto, Ontario

        Thanks, Stephanie! I really hope so, there's so many harmful substances in our everyday products!

      • AliciaC profile image

        Linda Crampton 

        4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

        Thanks for the useful information. I've never thought much about the effects of sulfates on hair. I like the sound of sulfate-free shampoo.

      • StephanieBCrosby profile image

        Stephanie Bradberry 

        4 years ago from New Jersey

        You provide a lot of good information here. I think more and more people are becoming educated about what is, and is not, good for their body inside and out.

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